$100,000 ESSAY CONTEST

for Middle & High School Students

What will you do to stop hatred and discrimination?

Teachers! Get
Your Students
Involved

NEW

Teacher's
Guide

Winners
2014

NEW

Contest
Guidelines

Connect to Curriculum

Participating in Stop the Hate: Youth Speak Out addresses the following National Content Standards:

The National Council for Social Studies (NCSS)
Standard II: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time.
Standard IV: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.
Standard VI: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power, authority, and governance.
Standard X: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic.

The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)
Standard 4: Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, and vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
Standard 5: Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
Standard 6: Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
Standard 7: Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, and people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
Standard 12: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

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